Supreme Court’s Vinod Dua Verdict: Significant Victory for Freedom to Dissent or Missed Opportunity?

In this post, the author explains the rationale behind the Supreme Court’s recent decision to acquit veteran journalist Vinod Dua in a sedition case against him. Further, the author demonstrates the inadequacy of protection conferred against prosecution for sedition under Section 124A of Indian Penal Code, 1860, by the Vinod Dua verdict, and highlights ongoing litigation which could pave the way for ridding India of its oppressive sedition law. Continue reading Supreme Court’s Vinod Dua Verdict: Significant Victory for Freedom to Dissent or Missed Opportunity?

A Stand-Up Comedian and His Criminal Liability Owing to Jokes Insulting Religious Beliefs of a Community

In this article, the authors argue that the jokes of a stand-up comedian, made merely to entertain people cannot always be regarded to be of such nature which could qualify the ingredients of an offence of hurting religious sentiments defined under Indian Penal Code, 1860. With the help of judicial precedents, the authors identify different categories of blasphemy and identify the instances in the which a person be made liable, with a specific emphasis on stand-up comedy.
Continue reading A Stand-Up Comedian and His Criminal Liability Owing to Jokes Insulting Religious Beliefs of a Community