Call for Papers: RMLNLU Law Review Volume XI

 ABOUT RMLNLU Dr. Ram Manohar Lohiya National Law University, formerly Dr. Ram Manohar Lohiya National Law Institute, is an institute for law in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India. Dr, RMLNLU was established in 2005, and since then, has been providing undergraduate and postgraduate legal education. ABOUT THE JOURNAL RMLNLU Law Review (‘Journal’) is an annual Journal published by the Journal Committee of Dr. Ram Manohar Lohiya … Continue reading Call for Papers: RMLNLU Law Review Volume XI

No Privacy for Prisoners in India

In this post, the author argues that the increasing installation of CCTV cameras in barracks and cells of prisons by state governments violates the right to privacy of prisoners. The author strives to establish how Supreme Court’s direction to install CCTV cameras in prisons fails to satisfy the proportionality and necessity test laid down by it in the Puttaswamy judgment, and therefore the SC needs to revisit its direction in light of the right to privacy recognised by it. Continue reading No Privacy for Prisoners in India

Artificial Intelligence and Market Regulation: The Way Forward for the CCI

In this post, the authors highlight the potential anti-competitive concerns emerging from the use of Artificial Intelligence by enterprises. They analyse competition regulators’ practices worldwide and provide logistical suggestions to suit the Indian context. Continue reading Artificial Intelligence and Market Regulation: The Way Forward for the CCI

In Pursuit of Exclusion: Foreigners Tribunals: Part II (Through the Lens of International Law)

In this post, the author argues as to how the working of the Foreigners Tribunals does not adhere to set international standards and concludes by suggesting reforms which shall be incorporated to protect the rights of those concerned. Continue reading In Pursuit of Exclusion: Foreigners Tribunals: Part II (Through the Lens of International Law)

In Pursuit of Exclusion: Foreigners Tribunals: Part I (Structural Deficiencies)

In this post, the author discusses the structural deficiencies in the working of the Foreigners Tribunals established as per the Foreigners Act, 1946 and the Foreigners (Tribunal) Order, 1964. The author further discusses the evidentiary hiccups created as a result of shifting the burden of proof on the accused. Continue reading In Pursuit of Exclusion: Foreigners Tribunals: Part I (Structural Deficiencies)

BlogTalk 2.0: Mr. Anoop Rawat on Corporate Restructuring and Insolvency

The Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, enacted in 2016, has reconceptualised the framework for insolvency resolution in India. The Code being at a nascent stage has been amended on a number of occasions and has been a subject of widespread debate. In pursuance of the same, we sat with Mr. Anoop Rawat, Equity Partner, Shardul Amarchand Mangaldas and Company, for a short discussion on the impact of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code and the surrounding issues. Our discussion followed from the need of an efficient infrastructure for the effective implementation of the resolution plan, the impact of COVID-19 in maintaining the operations of the Corporate Debtor as a going concern, the need to streamline the Indian debt regulations and more. Continue reading BlogTalk 2.0: Mr. Anoop Rawat on Corporate Restructuring and Insolvency

Indian Agrarian Distress and Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership: A Study on India’s Trade Deficit and Plant Variety Protection Laws

In this post, the authors analyse the issues pertaining to the proposed Free Trade Agreement between India, China along with ASEAN member nations and five other countries. The authors analyse these issues with a special emphasis on India’s pending Trade Deficit with China and other member nations and the consequences of amending our Plant Variety Protection laws. Continue reading Indian Agrarian Distress and Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership: A Study on India’s Trade Deficit and Plant Variety Protection Laws

Extinguishment of Claims Under the IBC: A Fresh Slate

In this article, the authors analyse the issue of extinguishment of claims in order to provide a fresh slate to the resolution applicant who takes over the debt ridden corporate debtor in light of the Supreme Court’s Essar Judgment. Recently, the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal and the Rajasthan High Court have relied on the same to hold that the claims prior to the passing of the resolution plan stand extinguished. Continue reading Extinguishment of Claims Under the IBC: A Fresh Slate

Judges in Legislature: Can the Gap be Bridged Without Hurting the Separation?

In this post, the author has analysed the interaction of the judiciary with the legislature via-a-vis the separation doctrine, the position in contemporary jurisdictions and the bleak possibility of such a structure in a democratic federal set-up like India.
Continue reading Judges in Legislature: Can the Gap be Bridged Without Hurting the Separation?